measure


measure
01. The severity of an earthquake is [measured] using a device known as the Richter scale.
02. A close [measurement] of the room showed it to be larger than we had thought.
03. Sophie made a mistake when she [measured] Marly to shorten his pants.
04. There are marks all over one of our kitchen walls from where we have [measured] our children's height as they have grown over the years.
05. Hal's pet snake [measures] almost 5 feet long.
06. We need to do regular evaluations in order to [measure] our students' progress in English.
07. Chinese scientists recently began to [remeasure] Mount Everest for the first time in 20 years, checking theories that it is growing about a centimeter each year.
08. Many teachers feel that tests are not necessarily a valid [measure] of a student's progress.
09. William R. Alger once said that the wealth of a soul is [measured] by how much it can feel.
10. Zelda Fitzgerald once observed that nobody has ever [measured], not even poets, how much the heart can hold.
11. There is a Kenyan proverb which states that if you receive a gift, don't [measure] it.
12. Electrical current is [measured] in cycles.
13. One of the most commonly used [measures] of social inequality is occupational prestige.
14. In traditional African communities, cattle are considered a [measure] of wealth and prestige.
15. In Somalia, a family's status in the community is often [measured] by the number of camels it owns.
16. In 1793, France became the first country to use the metric system of weights and [measures].
17. The government needs to take [measures] to curb violent crime.
18. It is important that your [measurements] be precise when putting in an order for new curtains.
19. A mercury thermometer cannot [measure] temperatures lower than minus 38.8 degrees Celcius because the mercury freezes at that point.
20. The first standardized system of [measurement] was developed in Mesopotamia around 4,700 years ago.

Grammatical examples in English. 2013.

Synonyms:

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  • measure — meas ure (m[e^]zh [ u]r; 135), n. [OE. mesure, F. mesure, L. mensura, fr. metiri, mensus, to measure; akin to metrum poetical measure, Gr. me tron, E. meter. Cf. {Immense}, {Mensuration}, {Mete} to measure.] 1. A standard of dimension; a fixed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • measure — [mezh′ər] n. [ME mesure < OFr < L mensura < mensus, pp. of metiri, to measure < IE base * mē , to measure > MEAL1, Sans mātrā, a measure, Gr metron] 1. the extent, dimensions, capacity, etc. of anything, esp. as determined by a… …   English World dictionary

  • Measure K — is an ordinance put on the city of Santa Cruz s annual ballot on November 6, 2006. It s purpose was to give marijuana violations the lowest priority for local law enforcement. All other offenses besides adult marijuana offenses were put to a… …   Wikipedia

  • Measure — Meas ure, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Measured}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Measuring}.] [F. mesurer, L. mensurare. See {Measure}, n.] 1. To ascertain by use of a measuring instrument; to compute or ascertain the extent, quantity, dimensions, or capacity of, by a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • measure — ► VERB 1) determine the size, amount, or degree of (something) by comparison with a standard unit. 2) be of (a specified size). 3) (measure out) take an exact quantity of. 4) (measure up) reach the required or expected standard. ► NOUN 1) …   English terms dictionary

  • measure — I noun act, bill, caveat, declaration, decree, dictate, edict, enactment, law, legislation, legislative enactment, legislative mandate, legislative proclamation, mandate, piece of legislation, prescript, prescription, proposal, proposed act,… …   Law dictionary

  • measure — [n1] portion, scope admeasurement, admensuration, allotment, allowance, amount, amplification, amplitude, area, bang, breadth, bulk, capacity, degree, depth, dimension, distance, duration, extent, fix, frequency, height, hit, magnitude, mass,… …   New thesaurus

  • measure up to — measure up (to (someone/something)) to reach a standard that is as good as someone or something else. The math skills of the majority of children in this school measure up to the national standards. Usage notes: often used in a negative way: They …   New idioms dictionary

  • measure up — (to (someone/something)) to reach a standard that is as good as someone or something else. The math skills of the majority of children in this school measure up to the national standards. Usage notes: often used in a negative way: They didn t… …   New idioms dictionary

  • Measure — Meas ure, v. i. 1. To make a measurement or measurements. [1913 Webster] 2. To result, or turn out, on measuring; as, the grain measures well; the pieces measure unequally. [1913 Webster] 3. To be of a certain size or quantity, or to have a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • measure of — To be the (or a) standard by which to judge the quality, etc of ● measure …   Useful english dictionary